Carnivorous plants in Florida

Did you know that more species of carnivorous plants flourish in the wetlands of Florida than anywhere else in the country. I visited Apalachicola National Forest a few days ago and photographed 4 types. There are several different types of carnivorous plants native to Florida, including six species of pitcher plants (Sarracenia), five species of sundews (Drosera), fourteen species of bladderworts (Utricularia), and six species of butterwort (Pinguicula). I photographed 2 species of pitcher plants and 2 species of sundew. Pitcher plants emit an attractive nectar that lures insects to the lip of the pitcher, where they then slip and fall inside. Once at the bottom of the pitcher, tiny hairs prevent the insect from crawling back out to safety. The trapped insect will either drown in accumulated rainwater or die from exhaustion. Digestive enzymes are then secreted by the plant and the insect soon becomes a meal for the pitcher plant. Sundews, such as this spoonleaf sundew (Drosera intermedia), are covered by a sticky substance that traps insects to its surface.
Like the pitcher plants, sundews emit a sweet smell that entices insects to come near it. Sundews are covered in a sticky mucus-like substance that is filled with digestive enzymes. Once the insect lands on the sticky plant, the tentacle-covered leaves of the sundew curl around it and suffocate the insect before digesting it.

Tracy's Sundew (1)
Tracy’s Sundew (1)
Tracy's Sundew (2)
Tracy’s Sundew (2)
Yellow Picher Plant (1)
Yellow Picher Plant (1)
Yellow Picher Plant (2)
Yellow Picher Plant (2)
Yellow Picher Plant (3)
Yellow Picher Plant (3)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (1)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (1)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (2)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (2)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (3)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (3)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (4)
Parrot Pitcher Plant (4)
Pink Sundew (1)
Pink Sundew (1)
Pink Sundew (2)
Pink Sundew (2)

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